How to Defeat FoMO: Be Your Own Best Friend

Fear of Missing Out, or FoMO, was something I often experienced way before I knew there was a funny acronym for it. Being casual friends with several different circles throughout high school, I didn’t feel like an integral part of any one friend group. I felt like an afterthought, dispensable, unimportant. I’d be invited to... Continue Reading

It’s Okay to be Uncertain of Your Post-Graduation Future

It was a rainy Tuesday morning in the fall of 2013, and I was taking the bus to my first day of English 1100. Summer had ended just as abruptly as most good things tend to. My youth is over, I remember thinking. Time to get serious. Our first lecture was on “rhetorical skills,” a... Continue Reading

The Surrey Latin Festival Helps Teach the Public More About Latin America

Note: This article uses the terms “Latino” and “Hispanics” as gender-neutral labels for Spanish-speakers from Central and South America. As someone who was born in Panama and is half Venezuelan, many people approach me and ask where I am from. I usually respond with, “I’m from Panama” but, there’s always a 98 per cent chance... Continue Reading

There’s No Such Thing as a “Politically Neutral” LGBTQ+ Symbol

Amidst protesters and supporters, cops raised the LGBTQ+ pride flag at Surrey RCMP headquarters for the first time on June 24. The protests against the raising of the flag were led by the anti-LGBTQ+ group Culture Guard, whose leader, Kari Simpson, called the rainbow flag a “political symbol” and claimed that the RCMP raising the... Continue Reading

The Underappreciated Perks of Living on a Fault Line

It’s summer in B.C. and people are either jumping in their jorts for patio season, or complaining that it’s a) too hot, b) not hot enough, c) too expensive to do anything fun, or d) that there is nothing to do. As British Columbians, we also deal with water restrictions and the potential threat of... Continue Reading

Greater Vancouver is Not Ready for 24/7 Train Service

Residents of Metro Vancouver rely on and value its fast and frequent train system, and while there are many benefits to this mode of travel, it still has its downsides. The Millennium, Expo, and Canada Line stop running between 1:00 a.m. and 2:00 a.m., depending on which day of the week it is. This schedule... Continue Reading

Quebec’s New Bill on Banning Public Service Workers from Wearing Religious Items is Dangerous

Bill 21—which prohibits public service workers such as teachers, police officers, and judges from wearing religious items like hijabs, turbans, kippas, and crucifixes on the job—was officially passed by the Quebec government on June 16.  The reason behind passing this bill is that the Quebec government wants its government to present as secular, and believes... Continue Reading

Ask KPU: How Do You Connect with Nature?

Photos by Kristen Frier For many, taking a step away from the hectic and often overwhelming demands of urban life can help refresh our sense of emotional wellbeing.  Each KPU campus has its own little pockets of nature, like the farm school gardens in Richmond, the greenhouses in Langley, or the forested spaces in Surrey... Continue Reading

What It Takes to Get Banned from Facebook

The phrase “freedom of speech” gains entirely different shades of meaning depending on who is using it and what it is being used for. That being said, whether the First Amendment—or, for Canadians, Section Two of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms—applies to social media platforms has proven to be even more of a divisive... Continue Reading

The Underappreciated Perks of Living on a Fault Line

It’s summer in B.C. and people are either jumping in their jorts for patio season, or complaining that it’s a) too hot, b) not hot enough, c) too expensive to do anything fun, or d) that there is nothing to do.   As British Columbians, we also deal with water restrictions and the potential threat of... Continue Reading

How to Respond to Hate in the Digital Age

Given Canada’s reputation as the nice, friendly neighbour to the U.S., one would be forgiven for believing that our country is immune to the rise of white nationalism that has occurred since Trump’s election.  Sadly, this is not the case. For an article published just this April, the Globe and Mail sifted through 150,000 messages... Continue Reading

Investing in a Murder House Might Actually Be Worth It

If you’re thinking about buying a murder house, the first thing you should do is find someone like Randall Bell.  Bell is a real estate appraiser who specializes in “stigmatized properties.” According to an article published by The Hustle, Bell has priced and sold dozens of murder houses, including the home where Nicole Brown Simpson... Continue Reading

Filipino Heritage Festival Celebrated at Civic Plaza

The Filipino Heritage Festival, held on June 22 and 24, was headlined by renowned Filipino singer Yeng Constantino and featured Filipino talent across disciplines. The two-day event showcased many performances from dance groups such as Praise Team Dance Crew, Bibak Dancers, and Philippine Historama Society. Harvic Dominguez, a Filipino fashion designer from the Mountain Province,... Continue Reading

B.C. Created 600 New Reasons to Go Camping in 2019; Here are Two More

Last month, B.C. announced that nearly 600 new campsites will be created in parks and recreation sites across the province. This is in addition to the 431 campsites constructed last year, bringing our two-year net gain of campsites to 1,025.  Now, if camping isn’t something you do much, you’re probably missing out. All it really... Continue Reading

How to Get More out of Life by Owning Less

When I was younger, I was really into the movie Fight Club.  The film, based off of a book by Chuck Palahniuk, is known for its depiction of violence and toxic masculinity, and for its nihilistic spite towards social conformity. I loved it because of its thematic focus on the main character’s realization that materialism... Continue Reading